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Haibike xDuro FatSix RC (2016)

electric bikes kent, Haibike, review, tested, XDURO -

Haibike xDuro FatSix RC (2016)

2015’s xDuro FatSix was incredibly popular, selling out around the UK. Whether you want it as a serious eMTB or you just want to turn heads on the commute to work, it will succeed at both.


There are two xDuro Fat bikes for 2016. The RC detailed here, and the higher spec RX (forks, gear set, and brakes) which will cost you an extra seven hundred-odd pounds. The RX is in the camo-green colour scheme of 2015.

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The FatSix RC can travel where other bikes fear to go. Snow, sand, mud, or just the roughest terrain. It’s 26” Schwalbe Jumbo Jim Snake Skin wheels are 4” wide (and will take quite something to puncture), though you may need to get used to the ride as it’s quite unlike any other electric Haibike.


Other components are the Shimano SLX 10 speed gear set (with Deore rapid fire gear levers), RST's new Renegade suspension forks (air adjustable) offering 100mm of comfortable travel, and Tektro hydraulic disc brakes when you need them.

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Although it’s in the xDuro range and would have a slightly different frame to any sDuro anyway, the FatSix has a very different frame to the entire Haibike range. It’s been developed from the ground up, featuring an optimised bottom bracket, a neutral steering angle, and a 197mm extra wide rear wheel hub.


Like all xDuro bikes, the FatSix has the big new 500Wh Bosch battery. If you kept the assistance level on it’s lowest setting, and rode on flat, unchallenging ground, you should be able to ride for a mind-boggling one hundred and forty miles before the battery dies. If you keep it on full power and are up and down steep mountain trails, then it may come down to around thirty miles. I would imagine thirty miles of assistance would be enough if the terrain is that challenging.

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The top-of-the-line Bosch Performance CX motor nearly matches the Yamaha for torque (75Nm) and beats it in the percentages game, reaching 300%. So that means you can put enough effort to ride at 5mph (something I think my 98 year-old granny could do) and you’ll be whizzing along at 15mph. And like the Yamaha, I couldn’t hear any noise from the motor. It’s also 38% smaller than the previous xDuro motor (xDuro2, as shown below left).


It’s all controlled with the Intuvia display, virtually unchanged from last year’s detachable piece of kit.